De-Lurking on the Net

May 7, 2017

Curse of being a Pakistani

In this countries ranking survey website Pakistani passport comes at the at 92 and Afghanistan at 93 out of 159 countries. The website also tells which countries offer free visa travel and which countries need visas or electronic visa for which passport. Pakistanis are the ones leaving in droves to settle abroad mostly as economic migrant. But sometimes they are running away from torture, false accusation of blasphemy or simple discriminations as being minority. Though, in many countries, Pakistanis get discriminated, denied the refuge and often deported but the exodus of muslims, non-muslims from Pakistan continues unabated. This article in Herald Dawn newspaper of Pakistan

The perils of Pakistani migrants heading to Europe

is pretty detailed and apt. No doubt terrorism of Pakistan has been headache for the world. Though it is far less now in spite of having a recent spike and upsurge which is since abated and gone. Minorities along with muslims,  genuine Pakistanis all suffer. But what was the reason for  British to unleash the curse of Pakistan onto the world or why those Muslims who lived in that part were demanding a land of pure, a land for salvation and everlasting happiness knowing full well the support for Pakistan was coming from feudals, Nawabs (the Indian Lords)  etc who would have wanted to safeguard their interests in post-independence Pakistan. Why were the Muslims trying to run away from competing with Hindus on education, jobs, businesses and seeking refuge under the religious umbrella.

British, on their part, it is claimed wanted to carve out Pakistan to have a foot in the door to stop USSR and Pakistan came about as Muslim League assured to provide the base for UK(and by default all of West) whereas the Indian National Congress denied giving this access to anyone post independence. Hindus on their part before independence were still living in dark ages believing in untouchability (particularly wanted to be away generally in making any social contacts with Muslims or  Dalits). This strong feeling in Hindus, even though it is still not gone away fully yet but their divisions or old habits, prejudices etc are melting away and largely Indians including Muslims, Dalits etc have become more homogenous now after many reforms since independence like Hindu Undivided Family Laws where females inherit wealth on par with males, Reservations, Disbursement of lands to those cultivating and eliminating privy purses to ex-rulers(Maharajas) as well as eliminating large landholdings etc-2.

Hassan Nissar is  a veteran journalist who lives in Pakistan but in one TV conversation here,  I heard him describing the formation of Pakistan happened  due to meanness  of Indian National  Congress and its leader of that time not accepting the demand of Muslim league which was seeking confederation and separate electorate for Muslims.

  1.  
Nissar could not come out of his partiality for Mr Jinnah. He says Pt Nehru was midget in front of Mr Jinnah. Really! What makes him say that. Did Mr Jinnah  have vision for India, Pakistan or even Muslims?
Did Pt Nehru have vision for India? Yes Pt Nehru did have a vision as he wanted India to have strong centre? Why was strong centre needed? It was needed so that India ‘s parts were not usurped by outsiders like East  India Company  did in the past to India as it was having a weak centre then. A weak centre would have meant that centre like in the past would not be able to help any part that gets in trouble due to external imperialist/expansionist power attack. So, accepting the idea of confederation was becoming difficult for Pt Nehru. He  could also see  bringing in socialist upliftment of Masses. He could think of India ‘s  development on the lines of 5 years plans of USSR where USSR grew rapidly under those plans. These visions also entailed bringing in heavy industrial development, dams building, science education etc and of course he wanted to stablise the country post the partition trauma.
Now, let us see what vision did Mr Jinnah impart to the newly born nation Pakistan in the year after ’47 until his death in ’48.  Did Mr Jinnah  ever mention that he wanted to smash the feudalism and bring equality of masses. No, because Pakistan was born due to feudals giving support to Jinnah for making Pakistan. So, how could he turn his back on them. This was also one reason the Kashmiri secular leader Sheikh  Abdullah did not see the Kashmir ‘s destiny in Pakistan. Did Mr Jinnah think of safeguarding non-Muslims like Hindus, Christians, Buddhists, Jews, Ahmedies etc. So,  did Mr Jinnah bring in any protection law for them. He was busy usurping Baluchistan, busy sending raiders in Kashmir in spite of signing stand-still agreement with Maharaja. To this day, his policy of Kashmir is followed avidly by Pakistan. He was busy dismissing the elected govt  of NWF( present day KPK). He was busy seeking aid from USA and was ready to do anything for them (yet Pakistani loaths USA). He was busy lecturing Bengalis that Bangla language does not matter, it does not help integration and you have to give it up to become a proper Pakistani. Was he even thinking of making constituent assembly for making constitution. He was busy sidelining the persons he had used like Suhrawardy, Jogendra Nath Mandal(This chap was not Muslim enough to be taken into confidence on Kashmir etc). Jinnah was the biggest con artist even for Muslims as before the partition and after he was using these people and others, inciting many many others including Ambedkar, South Indians like Periyar (to seek Dravidistan) Nizam, Nawab of Junagadh to seek separation from India. He was telling Muslims that they can’t  live with Hindus as Muslim God or inspirations are different,  Muslim’s language is different, or culture is different. But soon after partition Mr Jinnah  was parroting the songs of secularism(his 11th Aug speech), which Congress was talking about all along before or after the partition. Did Mr Jinnah ever write a book or leave any notes that you could have a look at his vision before or after partition. No, he did not leave anything behind. Nehru on the other hand had written books on which you can judge him even today for his vision. In 1938, Nehru was appointed the chairman of planning by Mr SC Bose(famous revolutionary leader who sought help from Japan, Germany to bring down Brtitish) on the recommendation of famous Indian scientist Meghnad Saha. So, it is no wonder, Pakistanis remain confused to this day about Mr Jinnah, the con artist  if he was secular or was a hard core Muslim. Mr Jinnah had believed in confederation when he was negotiating with the Congress but not when he was usurping Baluchistan and trying to capture Kashmir or integrating NWFP. He was not thinking about democracy being driven in Pakistan from Bengal as at that time East Pakistan or Bengal was the most populous state in erstwhile Pakistan. He was not thinking of making Dhaka, the capital of Pakistan or imposing Bengali language on the rest of the Pakistanis. Though, Jinnah had no qualms imposing Urdu on Bengali people.
So, this man had no consistent principles and no vision of driving down democracy or equality, development, security of people in Pakistan. He is the reason Muslims are divided into three and not because of ‘Congress ki Kaminagi’ (or meanness of Congress) as Nisar seems to suggest in that chat when he fails to see the hypocrisy of Mr Jinnah. Mr Jinnah was the one asking for separate Muslim electorate before partition to safeguard the Muslims interests but he was not thinking of safeguarding any Hindu interests in Pakistan post independence. Elimination of Hindus was still going on fullscale in both Eastern and Western wings while Mr Jinnah was running Pakistan. Mr Jinnah is the reason bulk of the Pakistani Muslims are exploited and  trapped in endemic poverty in present day Pakistan as the feudals lord over everyone in concert with the Army, Mullahs and few prominent families.  Everybody else Hindus, Christians etc (including minority Muslims too) are suffering too along with them and  the law of blasphemy is the one that defines today’s Pakistan and is used against all specially the minorities. So, who was the midget Mr Nissar again? Mr Jinnah or Pt Nehru? It is hard to believe that Mr Nissar, who can read and analyse virtually all things very well can not see that Mr Jinnah was full of contradictions. Perhaps his love for Mr Jinnah blinds him so much as not to acknowledge the faults of Mr Jinnah. I do not know, if one would call Mr Jinnah conniving or duplicitous in saying one thing and believing in completely opposite but this (being duplicitous) has become Pakistan leaders’ national character. Can anyone trust anyone?

November 20, 2016

Mr Trump, Mr Modi, Democracies & Intelligence

Here is a video between  Mitt Romney and Trump just compiled by BBC. See how Mr Romney was judging Mr Trump in this video –

Mr Trump is a phony. His promises are as worthless as a degree from Trump University. His domestic policies would lead to recession. His foreign policies would make America and the world less safe. He has neither the temperament, nor the judgement to be president and his personal qualities would mean that America would cease to be a shining city on a hill.”

In this exchange of this video, it is clear that Mr Trump is hurling abuses at Mr Romney, while Mr Romney is analysing the man, Mr Trump is or would be in his presidency. It seems that Mr Romney has mapped out the capacities of  Mr Trump quite well but it just makes you wonder why those who can see the future, judge things minutely do hardly ever become head of the govt. Why do they  get defeated in elections.

However, I would like to apply the Romney’s assessment of Mr Trump, to the champion who is leading another democracy in the world, Mr Modi. So, let us see if Mr Modi possess that elusive quality to stave off recession by his domestic policies (demonetisation move) or if Mr Modi’s promises made at election time can be fulfilled.

mrmoditrump

India has been pretty nascent democracy in spite of its seventy years of age and the analysing capacities or scrutiny of the govts’ performances are seriously lacking in media or by opposition. Usually, either you are ready to throw away a govt like previous scam ridden govt of UPA led by Congress or you are ready to revere a govt without understanding the implications of any govt initiative. So, analysis is missing but either hurling of abuses is non-stop or showering effusive praises are endless. The current govt of Mr Modi is having a easy time in spite of giving awful time to the public by its recent drive of de-monetisation  or rather reissuing a Indian currency note and introducing a bigger note. Public is staying calm because indirectly, it seems that rich people have become less rich overnight and some sort of redistribution of wealth is going on between rich and poor in order to defeat the govt drive to eliminate black money. The poor people are getting offered a commission in order to help convert rich people’s black money into white, legitimate money. The poor people can not resist the powerful rich people(politicians included) either due to their display of force,  power by rich or due to the poor people’s own greed or need. Somehow reverence of Modi gets converted into a devotion of him in spite of the hardships of standing daily in the queues to convert the money from black to white rather than going to earn your daily wage. Chances of  wiping out a big chunk of GDP seems certain that relied on the availability of black money. So, how much of a big hole in GDP will it cause remains to be seen. Will it usher recession or merely drop some GDP growth rate is not clear to any one. Will it wipe out corruption or bring back black money stashed overseas as promised at election? It is pretty clear, it will not. It would just eliminate some black money. It will help RBI(Reserve Bank Of India) and govt to strengthen the banks balance sheets by infusing new funds into them.

A roar goes out against those who throw the pebble in the wells where devotees of Mr Modi also called Bhakthas in Hindi not only dwell but have been enjoying themselves in great numbers – specially on most of the WhatsApp groups. Discovering myself at the receiving end, recently I had wondered if  they should be dared to be asked if any of them had ever read anything beyond local publications from New York Times, Washington Post, Globe & Mail, Telegraph, Guardian or Le Monde about demonetisation drive of Mr Modi. But I resisted the urge after remembering  been questioned already once when BBC was quoted wherein a quote of the Indian PM’s speech of 2014 was referred. But Bhaktas had told that BBC was hardly trustworthy source even if it was a direct quote of the PM. One of the Bhaktha sometimes back had called the BBC as ‘Bak Bak Corporation’ meaning BBC just knows how to yap most of the time.

Recently, I was watching a video  by Mr Arun Puri, an ex editor of a magazine called India Today. Mr Puri has been very eloquent in this video in summing up Mr Modi‘s inning thus far. When Mr Modi campaigned during elections, he was projecting all kinds of hopes in the minds of voters as well as giving the ray of optimism to the world. May be, he just projected and promised too much. It seemed as if he will not only be able to stop the corruption, scams of previous govt, but also  be able to bring the efficiency in his new govt like it was never seen before. Unfortunately, he has ended up only tinkering mostly, so far in his new bureaucratic governance even though spawning some new initiatives like MakeInIndia, JanDhanYojna etc. In the early days of 2014, when he was sworn in he had raised the hope greatly by saying him believing in minimum govt, maximum governance . The Cabinet is now 80-member strong, up from 45 when Mr Modi came to power two years ago.
The tinkered bureaucratic system in India by Mr Modi is hardly ever going to complain about not changing much as why would the bureaucrats or the system  machinery not like to retain their status quo. The public is hardly ever going to debate it, if the media does not display the state of affairs to the public. The opposition is abysmal, the media delinquent, boot licking type. It is strange that Mr Arun Puri till date, had not had a chance to say his bit that he has just said in this video. I wonder how could he never got a chance to say it earlier. Why could he not write this in local media or international media. May be he waited, perhaps, for the right occasion or perhaps like most in journalistic circles, he too was not ready to take on the sloganeering brigade of Bhakthas. Let us see how he copes with the new attention that he will now draw from those in power. But I am glad, he took the opportunity to judge Mr Modi‘s govt now. Like him, I had always felt the same.  Mr Modi perhaps finds himself overawed  in that position. He offers simplicity and sincerity in the face of complex issues, problems. The plethora of advisers must be making it really tricky for him. It is difficult to drop an advice on your own, if you can not think beyond the simple things and do not understand all the complexity of a system. In financial systems, demonetisation and impact of globalisation on investment, currency flows, corruption, recession, growth etc is even hard for most people to understand, so would it be any wonder if the simple leaders do not understand it. They rely on advisers alone. So, how will one make its mind  before deciding to dump this advice or that advice. I am not surprised that Mr Modi has got lost in this conundrum.   Unfortunately,  Indian political scene is totally bereft of intelligent people in politics who could attain a position one day to challenge him politically. The political parties are really controlled by few people or groups and real talent within parties get stifled and never allowed to rise. It is not true that no intelligence exists there but what is there can never rise.  But this  democracy in India will not fail you as comprehensively as it does in most other countries where not only honesty, competence of the leader remains suspect but is also that of the leader’s advisers that the leader himself has gathered around him. One could easily conclude that democracy is a compromised system of government as individual intelligence of those not near power have not much role to play in it.

November 9, 2016

Sledge Hammer strike by India’s PM Modi on black economy and terrorism funding

Today, Mr Modi went bold. Perhaps not of his own volition but on behest of what all the economic advisors he could muster in last few months, advised him. He struck the  big denomination Indian currency notes void(Rs 500, Rs 1000). Some say these large notes amount to 86% of economy. Indians have guessed that economy is as much in black as it has been in legal/legitimate or white economy. So, given that both 86% is a guess and dividing line between black and white as at 50% of guess, then Mr Modi is writing off 43% of GDP in one hit. No matter what % is hit, the impact will be to usher the huge deflation in its black economy. It comes on the heel of his visit to Japan, a country staying in deflation since its hay days of 1993, before which it had seen any boom. Perhaps, it is just a coincidence.

pm-modi-ends-rs-500-rs-1000-currency-notes-read-his-full-address-here

His intentions can not be construed as wrong as he wanted to hit the most, two sets of people – 1) terrorists 2) Black economy peddlers who have refused to come out in open in spite of the amnesty to convert their black money into white(The scheme was not failed but could hardly be called a successful scheme).

So, what happens now – he introduces two type of notes – Rs 500 and Rs 2000 . These are not Plastic polymer notes as recently got introduced in number of countries (Australia, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Vietnam, Maldives etc) but it has new security features. Some say , Rs 2000 note has NGC technology . Details of the NGC has not emerged from Govt sources but social media rumors are fueling this. The NGC introduced in Philippines did not have any nano GPS chip as people are talking of Rs 2000 will have one. Without introducing a fool proof arrangement of  temper prevention or making it tough for some people or countries to stay in printing duplicate currency  and sending it to India, this whole exercise achieves nothing but brings pain to India. You merely burn your own notes.

There are terrorists using Hawala market, an arrangement where someone who wishes to send money into India does not go to banks or use legitimate companies. They use individuals who disburse Indian rupees from their black money in India to the recipient and get paid in return in foreign currency in a foreign country abroad. Such transactions were major source for black marketers to convert their money into white, money launderers to launder money, terrorists to get funded for new terrorist acts, drug pushers, smugglers etc . The cinema(Bollywood) largely depended on black money for funding. The Real estate particularly in north India had a big share of black money in it. All the political parties virtually live on black money. There is a domestic currency based trade between Iran and India. India’s currency is also used and particularly popular in Gulf  countries and in a country like Zimbabwe who are in the process of re-introducing their own currency again after a hiatus of several years. So, will all these people or even diaspora spread around the world will have all their money in bank or would be in position to change these notes in time?

So, immediate impact would be less housing activity, less Bollywood Cinema films, less terrorism (at least for now), less smuggling(all the smugglers money is never fully invested in metals like gold or other commodities but also remains in hard currency), less drug trafficking. There will be less activity in air travel and luxury living. There will be suffering for both poor and rich people. Poor people hardly have bank accounts, so will be impacted  a great deal. There are remote , rural areas where there can never, ever be a bank.  Even if such people have notes with honest earning or sent by their relations or kids, they will never know how to go inside a bank and convert it. There will be people not been able to pay to private hospitals. Govt hospitals rarely exist  for most in the country. There will be people who hide the money and unable to return in time to the places where they hid it to convert it or have anyone to access their money to convert it. Virtually all sectors in India have humongous corruption from ISRO scientists to judges, from North to South, West to East India. So, what happens when people suddenly have less financial muscle. Well it means, that their economic activity goes down including expenses on exorbitant weddings. So, hoteliers, caterers, etc all will have impact. It is like dropping a bomb on your own economy or helping your enemies who may all want your GDP to come down to a very low level or to see  your purchasing capacity substantially reduced.

The notes  can be converted in next 50 days . But beyond a threshold  of converting Rs 4000 in cash of new notes, conversion is allowed only by the bank accounts. If someone does not have their own bank account, then they have to use some one else’s bank account by giving them consent to receive his/her money into their accounts. Later on,  such people can withdraw their money in new notes from the account for which they consented. So, this particular activity will make the menace of already accumulated black money  in the economy to reduce substantially and it will become trackable until it stays in bank. It may stay long term in bank accounts but chances of its  staying in bank accounts long term are remote as people are used to cash transactions.  This declaration by Mr Modi, therefore, will not make the economy to become overnight controlled by banks. The networks of black economy generation, terrorists funding or drug peddling mules, duplicate currency circulators, smugglers, betting, bribe givers, bribe takers  are not going to disappear overnight. They are part of the system just like political parties or corrupt judges.  So, a new black economy will start growing as soon as one ends. Yes, there will be  people who will suffer massively and a few may even commit suicides or may even die of heart attacks when they find themselves  ruined totally. Incremental changes like Jan Aadhar Yojana etc would have achieved Mr Modi’s dream of having a economy fully running via banks etc. in few years.

Misery awaits India in short term and this will have impact on  the growth of the world economy too. Perhaps, it will teach a lesson to the other leaders to be patient.

February 13, 2016

Security Council Reforms: Chasing up a mirage of veto power ?

Filed under: India,World — Geekay @ 4:11 am
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

 

Over the years , the Veto power has become a status symbol. Not been able to have it has become a problem and given rise to frustration unnecessarily for certain countries. The G4 nations comprising BrazilGermanyIndia, and Japan are four countries which support each other’s bids for permanent seats on the United Nations Security Council. Unlike the G7, where the common denominator is the economy and long-term political motives, the G4’s primary aim is the permanent member seats on the Security Council.

G4Summit2015

Security council ‘s permanent membership provides veto power. The veto power enables all the countries not to bypass the voice of the veto powered country exercising its veto on any vote. When Veto powers were given after second world war,  UK, France and   China also got vetoes. Though Veto should have been  denied to  all these three as France had somehow re-emerged as an independent country post its capture in the war. Let alone be the big power in its own right. The argument to give veto power to UK was also marginal, specially, neither after war, it was left as a significant big power militarily, nor it was economically strong any more. Similarly, like France and UK, China also should not have been given any veto power  as it too was a dirt poor country and not militarily strong at all. The veto power given to China, in fact ended up going to Taiwan soon as the republic of China whom veto power was given got driven out from its own country. So, one wonders what justification was there to hand over Veto power to  a country who was inherently so week that  it could not manage its own fate. Mainland communist China got Veto in ’71 when Taiwan ‘s veto was handed over to it but by then Communist block had got divided . Perhaps, it would have been better if at the time of UN formation there should have been created only two veto wielding powers  – USA and Soviet Union rather than 5. It should have been called the group veto powers  – Capitalist block veto, Communist block veto as for all purposes the veto exercising history went according to the block’s desires .

But, as no body surrenders power once they have it, so even though the nation (UK and France) may no longer be the front runners either in military power or economy, but they  will still want to hold onto their permanent membership and Veto Power forever even if they become more and more integrated or subsumed into NATO or EU. Being part of these groups will make them irrelevant as it will not allow them any freedom to pursue their own independent line to exercise veto. They can  only toe a group line on any significant international issue. So, here again, it makes one wonder why veto power should only be given to states and not to the group when for all purposes the veto is exercised by states as per the group ‘s dictates.

Now, Russia and China are both power houses in military and economy respectively and they are no longer part of  one block. Though, back again now on most critical occasions either they act in unison or ignore the situation so they should continue to hold onto their individual veto power as they have not forged a military alliance. Even though both Germany and Japan are also economically very -2 important at present but as both are not free to pursue their own independent line, so giving them a  veto power will be a waste.

The other significant country is India which has been rising significantly. It stands at 7th position GDP wise in 2015 and 3rd on PPP basis as can be seen here in this chart –

GDP-PPP

It also is not having any military alliance and  for all purposes, it pursues independent foreign policy. So, it is far more deserving than other candidates. There are many negative things about security council permanent position. First of all, it brings extra responsibility to deal with more and more international issues as the issues are becoming day by day more of global nature needing global solutions. Since, India has great number of issues at home to deal with,  perhaps it should give up pursuing to seek Veto Power for now.

The Security Council membership will bring the need of providing for extra funding too to UN Budget. India contributes just 0.5% to say 10% by Japan and little over 5% by China. This is how the funding situation was in 2013 –

Member state Contribution
(% of UN budget)
 United States

22.000

 Japan

10.833

 Germany

7.141

 France

5.593

 United Kingdom

5.179

 China

5.148

But the most important issue will be if India who usually does not take any stand at all on any issue, will have to start taking a stand after getting the veto power. But taking a stand means preparing to ruin your relationships as independent middle line stand will not be possible any more. Perhaps,  India is besotted to covet the Veto power for enhancing its reputation as a significant power otherwise benefits are not there for chasing it.

Being a non-aligned group’s leading voice in cold war era, when its voice was equi-distant on all international issues in the beginning of non-aligned movement and gradually fully become part and parcel of a pseudo member voice of Communist block led by Soviet Union. So, it chose either not to criticise Soviet Union, or criticise much too late otherwise only privately. This happened  when Communists occupation went into Hungary, Czechoslovakia or Afghanistan. But, American, Britain/France interventions were criticised far more vocally as it happened in Cuba, other parts of Latin America or Suez Canal occupation etc. Though, India now has drawn closer to USA but it has not abandoned Russia entirely. It is closer to both Iran and Israel as well as Saudi Arabia. It is also close to Japan but chances of it voting against China in Security Council are remote as  China has become its biggest trading partner. So, what role a veto given to India will bring to UN. One can surmise it will bring nothing at all. When Russia is involved anywhere, India offers only a muted reaction as it did in Syria, Ukraine, Crimea or Georgia. It remained taciturn when Turkey downed Russian plane because India also have somewhat OK relations with Turkey, a NATO country. In Middle east, both Palestine and Israel are close to India, so for all purposes being too close will prevent it to take any stand on Palestine. It did not act closer home too when Sri Lanka was exterminating Tamils in its north. The  fear was of Sri Lanka falling into the hands of China and Pakistan. It did  not ask or support demand for UN probe initially into the killing of Tamils while UK and west asked  UN team to investigate. It did not upset the Myanmar too by criticising or intervening when it was clear the Buddhists with the support of Myanmar military were burning down the houses of Rohingya Muslims, killing them or putting them adrift in boats with some food. Again the fear was same of losing the Myanmar to China. Then Maldives exploded, its elected president is incarcerated and the new one has taken control. India tried to convey its support for the incarcerated president but Maldives simply chose to ignore India’s stand. Even though, China is so far out in pacific but India chose  not  to press Maldives too for the fear of China getting a toehold in Maldives, which any way China still managed to get. So, when India can not decide on foreign policy issues with either clarity or strong authority at closer home or in distant lands, what point is there to covet a veto power. However, Pakistan and China oppose India to have Veto Power as if India will go into Pakistan straight away after getting the Veto power to free Baluchistan’s trapped people. The fact is India should not get the veto power for its own sake as until it becomes economically significant and able to resolve its internal problems, it will not push its stand on any issue anywhere strongly outside India. To push your stand one will need a far significant economy, content citizens  and a big military might behind and not merely the veto power.  Moreover, by having veto power, the focus would quickly move to international diplomacy from internally focussed development of the country. So rather than rising fast, it will lose its focus of growing rapidly. There will surely come a time when India will be a Veto Power inevitably but that time is still years away, perhaps a decade or so.

January 10, 2016

India needs Jobs (wealth) creation pro-active Initiatives

Just like, for many countries, India could focus on the two areas which create more jobs (including in outsourcing) besides producing revenue. These are tourism and agriculture. India is opening on-arrival visa regime for up to 150 countries soon. Before, it is done any tourism focussed initiative will help it big way to ramp up the revenues. But as before any new initiatives are considered, the funding for them should be arranged. For this, the special bonds in respective industry could be issued which may become redeemable after 10 years.

India has made beginning in both these areas but the inputs needed to make them contribute manifold are missing. Within tourism, the areas to focus should be medical tourism and adventure sports.

  1. Medical tourism

The new medical facilities can be opened by private public partnership (PPP). The govt. can provide the buildings(smart small clinics or mini specialist-hospitals) and equipments and give this facility on license or lease to doctors associations. They can run it on the same lines as private facilities such as Apollo, Fortis etc. The hotels or other residential areas in the vicinity can be developed by builders as patients will require areas to stay while convalescing. Such a facility provides the employment or training opportunity for both experienced (to run) and young doctors (trainee) besides bringing valuable foreign exchange and foreign tourists.

medical-tourism-in-india-swarna-18-638

Medical tourism is gathering momentum, one can see the growing revenue from this area for last 10 years but India is no4 after Mexico, Thailand, CostaRica. There is an outstanding opportunity to cut across the world in this area as most of Africa lacks the expertise or facilities. In America, Europe, the treatments as being so expensive, it gives opportunities to seek an outsourcing treatment contracts with the hospitals or govts or health insurance companies (such as BUPA, NHS etc) abroad. In fact, it will also benefit to improve the healthcare to Indian general public as well as there will be less pressure on the big public hospitals from those who can afford expensive treatments in India itself. India has 0.7 doctor to 1000 people in comparison to west where the best countries have 3 to 4 doctors per 1000 people. One of the lacunas could be perhaps not producing enough young doctors though India produces 3 times as many as USA.  First of all an assessment will be needed to figure out how many engg or medical employment positions are getting created annually in India. Not finding a job after a degree,  not only adds frustration to the students and families but also to the banks who may be adding these costs to Non-performing Assets(NPAs). There are roughly about 370 medical colleges, 49,840 MBBS seats and  charging Rs 50 lakh capitation each per annum in comparison to engineers ( 3,345 colleges, 15 lakhs students). Perhaps, lots of engg colleges should be converted into medical colleges and others closed down or students taught a particular craft to develop small scale or cottage industries – may be entrepreneurship too. The industry should be consulted for their annual requirements as education policy needs to be built to serve the industry. So, for formulating the education policy, education ministry should consult labour ministry, industrial ministry or directly survey industry’s needs and take inputs from planning commission plans in formulating type of colleges required in future and how many should be kept open or running. As clearly can be seen here India ranks in low income countries’ category when it comes to talk about healthcare infrastructure.

reaching-the-bottom-of-the-pyramid-6-728

 

  1. For adventure sports,

There can be any number of countries to emulate from. Most of them do not just engage in one sport but many acquire over the years a must status to visit for these types of tourists. Among these are New Zealand (Bungee Jumping etc), Switzerland(which has many trains going up the slopes or tunnels or has excellent piste infrastructure so it is good for many snow bound sports),  Australia (water sports- scuba diving, snorkeling), US(theme parks) etc.  The inputs such as setting up infrastructure – roads to such sites, the metal structures (Ropeways, support etc), concrete or building structure such as lifts taking to the mountains viewing areas, slopes etc can be built by issuing yet another tourism bonds.

New infrastructure can have ticket for entries to generate revenue and any hotels developed in that area can also have special tourism taxes to recover the infra building costs fast. So if the govt creates infrastructure as a priority, it will not take long to pay off the bonds. This initiative  will bring not only tourists(foreign and desis) to those areas but generate employment too. Infrastructure building will also help steel industry, as well as stop rich Indian people from flying abroad to spend foreign currency on these activities. The employment in areas where  very few other employment opportunities exist is particularly appealing.

Agriculture:

As India’s population will peak, its demand will go up in many of these areas. The areas for growth are olive production (Spain, Italy, Greece are leading countries but Israel could be tapped for exceptional high quality olive oil production who in spite of growing it in arid areas, using drip irrigation as well using salty (brackish) and purified wastewater which helps it to add natural fertilizers to the soil produces superior quality olives), mushroom production (China, Italy are leading and in USA, Pennsylvania, California are the leading ones), other edible oil production facilities particularly coconut oil where India is no 3 and Philippines is no1 with almost close to 4 times that of India’s production level, Orchards developments like in California to grow Almonds(which requires more water than how much olives need), Pistachio(good for arid areas – Iran is no 1 producer in it), Walnuts(US produces 9 times, China 8 times, Iran 5 times of India’s production level), apples, orange (citrus), plums(prunes). It will be particularly good in the  area of India’s Northeast where on the line of California orchards could be developed. As the North-East offers enough water resources (required for almonds etc) and the temp may be just right too but for production of pistachio(arid areas should be OK) and for Olive production could go to Rajasthan  bordering Punjab (as Olives need water too) or in dry areas of UP, AP, Maharastra etc for Pistachios. Orchards will largely depend on developing bee keeping industry too for pollination of fruits.

 

October 25, 2015

Make-In-india Initiative, is it viable?

India’s GDP stood at 2.066 trillion dollars in 2014. Amidst the plethora of initiatives, funding and new policy moves in India, there is one news that said India launches one stop Reserach funding for Research. It seems a good initiative on the surface as India was spending abysmal amount on research in comparison to other top countries. The latest data available from world bank was from 2012. But since it was not available for some countries,  2011 was chosen here to compare –

Global Research Spending by Major Countries

Country Year 2011
Korea 4.04
Israel 3.97
Japan 3.39
Swedan 3.39
Germany 2.89
Austria 2.77
USA 2.76
Iceland 2.6
Slovenia 2.47
France 2.25
Singapore 2.23
Belgium 2.21
Netherlands 2.03
China 1.84
Canada 1.79
UK 1.78
Russia 1.09
India 0.81

So, India spent 0.81 % of its GDP in 2011 or 15 billion US dollars. The west in general spends more than double to 5 times of India in percent terms. After adding this new spending,  does it change anything.  Well, with  this miniscule addition of 0.09%, it amounts to nothing when India’s biggest IT company TCS spends 900 Crore Rupees (14 million dollars)  itself which is close to this figure of 1000 Crore Rupees (15 million dollars) announced by govt of India. Also, if  this change will bring research from scientific labs of the govt or universities, institutes etc to the commercial entities is not clear. One can not think any new bridges have been built there between labs and industry.

Lately, India has made lots of interaction on international stage either by visiting their countries or inviting them over. India has been focussing to get some Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) from all these countries. But given that except few countries all are in deep hole. The few who have deep pockets are in Gulf, China or Norway(having largest pool of Oil related sovereign fund).  The UAE, China, Japan, US, Germany etc pledged to invest in India but how much does it really fructify remains to be seen. To attract this FDI, India of course had to give away something – which is market access. In some industries as defence and insurance, it has given access to 49% equity holding but in many areas the foreign companies or individuals can get access to  even 100% equity.

Only the other day, India’s one mobile infrastructure company Viom was sold to American Tower Corporation (ATC). After the deal in which it buys 51% holding of Indian which has 11.5% share of the market, the combined entity will have close to 15% market share or to the number three position  in the fragmented market. It is expected that this type of M&A activity will gather pace. Though a private law firm, “Linklaters” operating from Hong Kong says this – “The largest interest in Indian M&A has come from investors in the US.” The overall volume is down by 10% to second half of 2014 but in value terms the new FDI amount brought in  is now 15 billion dollars.

There is another Gold Monetisation Scheme announced for the festive Nov Season by govt of India. it is estimated  to mobilise a part of 20,000 tonnes (about 750 billion dollars) of idle gold lying with households and temples. What will it do to the International  bullion market also remains to be seen as that depends heavily on the Indian gold demand. Will it effect the gold jewellery makers as the people will deposit their gold in the banks to to earn interest on their gold. The logic says the state will melt this gold and use this to sell overseas to use the fund for development project like infrastructure building. So, two things should happen – first the state will give full interest only if it is allowed to melt the jewellery into gold, that means  who will spend money to  make jewellery . It means it should certainly affect the jewellery sector work. It also should affect the gold prices. it seems that the only way is down for them from here onward. Will it affect the international gold mining – of course it should. With most of the mining sector already sick, this certainly should drag gold sector in doldrums too. Being the largest gold producer of 300 tonnes, South Africa should be affected most of them all. But given nothing much came out of many pre-election promises (return of black money from abroad) , one should not assume that this scheme will definitely take shape or  be successful.

GoldJewelleryGoldBars

What about reforms on land, labour and GST(to transform india into one integrated market) etc. While GST is definitely on the schedule, it will be implemented on 1st April 2016 as per the govt website GST India. The growth estimated to be boosted by GST is estimated around 1.5 to 2% . This will give definitely boost to manufacturing. But any boost to manufacturing also needs many more ingredients e.g. increase in capacity of transportation networks, power generation  besides  the ability to hire labour at short term basis. There was a short one day strike in Sep, 2015  by labour unions. As per Economist’s article where union leaders claimed  150 millions downed their tool. The article said “The government wants to streamline India’s 44 labour laws into five codes covering wages, conditions, social security, industrial relations and training. It also proposes to raise the employment threshold at which employers must ask for permission from government to lay off workers—from 100 employees to 300—a reform that has already been adopted in the state of Rajasthan. In return it has offered unions a national minimum wage and a broader social-security net. Since only a small proportion of India workers are protected by any such legislation, there ought to be a new labour deal that would work for all. Sadly, many union bosses think otherwise.” So, chances of labour reforms succeeding do not look good. But even without it, labour laws are not completely archaic.There are many sectors where hiring and firing is easy and in Govt also  the voluntary retirement schemes are running.

The land reforms are already rolled back for now as the current incumbent govt do not control both houses and the opposition was in no mood to oblige the govt. But while land may be an issue in short term, it is not an issue in long term. The govt has time on its side to wait for this.

What about power sector reforms – well an article in June 2015 of Livemint, a financial paper asked its readers at the end of article “Will the government enact pricing reforms in the power sector?“. That says it all which means the reforms need one of the biggest courage from the govt. The chances of that happening looks slim at best as there are no talks seem on the horizon for its reforms.

There is one good initiative of integrating rural hinterland into banking sector by opening some 10 new banks  each with initial paid up equity of 200 crores rupees.  In her talks with Bloomberg, ICICI bank chief Mrs Kochar(youTube video) said  recently that  this initiative  will bring 180 million new bank customers, but the sword of Damocles keeps hanging in the form of non-performing assets (NPAs) of banks as the problem stays untackled. The patent regime to protect its own industry let alone companies of outside countries also needs strengthening and so does the capacity enhancement to judicial system. It is creaking at the moment. So, where does this all leave India.  Well, it amounts to nothing much for now.  But India is gathering steam bit by bit. One has to hold the breath. Perhaps, it will definitely achieve its potential or  bring success to the “Make in India” initiative if  it tackles many crucial ingredients mentioned here and it is definitely looking good at the moment.

December 16, 2014

Pakistan’s s Future could still be rosy after the latest mayhem

_79757855_pakistan_army_school_attack_624map

(courtesy Digital Globe: google Images)

So, soon after Malala got the Nobel Prize, this carnage today on a Pakistani Military School comes along, perhaps it is the biggest attack fatalities wise in Pakistan. Taliban seems to be the perpetrator. In spite of being poignant, I am looking again with the renewed vigour on Pakistan. There is this article from Shashi Tharoor on Pakistan and India relations, talks etc. Shashi Tharoor was the state foreign minister in last Indian govt. He came second to to Ban Ki Moon  of being head of the UN . He writes that it  is no policy for India not to engage with Pakistan in talks. I wonder what type of meaningless talks he advocates and with whom. All talks are meaningless as Pak Army has persisted with the same ideology of two nation theory and bleeding India to thousand cuts even after the appointment of its latest General, Mr Raheel Sharif. They do not want to give up controlling the Pak budget. It does not matter if it keeps the Pakistan sliding further into destitution. They are becoming good guys in the eyes of public at present though as TTP seems to have been suppressed or eliminated in spite of this one off carnage today. The attitude however on the path regarding capturing Kashmir or controlling Afghanistan has not changed one bit by Army. So, saving the terrorists or so-called Mujahid’s terror camps or their infiltration into Kashmir remains as before. Also, those Talibans were saved which may soon be operating in the  Afghanistan e.g. Haqqanis. The new Afghan govt is on the back foot at present as it can not afford to blame Pakistan straight away on daily unfolding bombs explosions.  It wants Pakistan to help in reconciliation with Talibans who have already started getting better results in the aftermath of withdrawal of NATO forces.

So, where do we stand ? The Afghan govt is definitely better equipped this time as against when USSR left Afghanistan in 1989. This time it has functional army with some tools handed over to them by US/NATO. But it is dependent on the handout from US etc and it has developed no self sustaining capacity financially. So, a sustained campaign by  Taliban reducing the govt capacity to fight back daily will make the Afghan Govt cede a sizeable controlling power  in Afghanistan soon to them. With that looming victory, the role of India and US in Afghanistan will soon be over and both of these powers have to reconcile to this fact. However, Mr Kerry is going to Pak to develop a good relationship of US with Pak. So, Pak army will be resurgent and confident in spite of occasional setbacks as today’s carnage. It has already started dictating to its civilian govt on India-Pak relations. So, in such a scenario, without doubt no brick can move in its  relationship with India either on trade or on other disputes irrespective of what civilian govt Pak may have? It is also not in India’s interests to pursue the repair of any relations with Pakistan when the army  remains in ascendance and largely in charge unless someone like Gen Musharraf comes again to the fore.

_79756185_79756184

(Courtesy AP – BBC)

This does not sound very optimistic but where does the future rests of Pakistani state. Well, it is entirely in the hands of Pak Army. If the army believe in the welfare of Pakistan and not just in the welfare of their own institution, then there is a solution.

In 1959, there was a proposal made by then Pakistani ruler Gen Ayub Khan to India for building joint Defence . It was shot down by India as it was not clear on joint defence against whom. India at the time wanted to follow avidly non-alignment as being its founder and Pakistan was a member of SEATO and CENTO and completely aligned with the west.  So, it would have meant defence against communist block. Mr Nehru, had however made several (at least 10) no-war pact proposals to Pakistan e.g. in 1949, 1958, 1963 but Pakistan rejected them all because it wanted Kashmir to be settled first.

Now, one thing that can happen which did not happen in the past  is for Pak Army to accept the divided Kashmir on the current boundaries (Ceasefire lines, Lines of Control etc)  and make a new  pact with India on joint military for any expeditions or joint missions e.g. terrorism or Maoism in India. It could be based on the same lines like UK and France have done. Such a pact should not be seeking only the joint defence against external enemies or no-war pact as these two sides offered to each other in the past. This should enable  Pakistan to stay together and be governable and be able to educate its public and make them reasonably well off. Pakistan will be able to exploit its resources and the  restive states as Baluchistan etc can become peaceful .In doing so, the Pak Military does not have to drastically reduce its budget but the  army  will also benefit as it does not have to compete any more with India on every modernisation effort Indian army engages in. It will help not only SAARC to become a proper union but also help Afghanistan to become viable. I am sure India will not shoot down such a proposal if it came from Pak Military. Trouble is India has to recognize that Indian civilian govt has to talk and negotiate either directly with Pak Army or with a group made up of civilian govt and Pak Army. This alone can help build the trust between these two eternal enemies (Pak and India) and this alone will establish that Pak definitely have an intent of moving forward  on its relations with India.

July 8, 2014

Making a Viable Afghanistan

Filed under: Democracy,Europe,India,Pak,USA,World — Geekay @ 6:51 am
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

To make Afghanistan viable, one has to compare it with the situation of Iraq as both have some similarities. In her interview recently, Hilary Clinton alluded to the reasons for Iraq hemorrhaging and falling apart. So, the new govt. of Afghanistan has to ensure from repeating the mistake of Iraq of alienation of its ethnic groups. Next, the task of sustaining Afghanistan will need elimination of dependence in most walks of nation’s life particularly as it is a landlocked country. The sustainability of any state depends on the economic activity and meeting defence needs.  India has already signed on being a security partner. Deal with the US should also happen after new Afghan president comes on board. So India has to ensure both these needs. Relationship of Afghanistan with Pakistan is a frayed one and the dependence on the only land route to sea via Pakistan has left Afghanistan vulnerable. So, just like it needs a formal deal with Pakistan, it needs to cut also a deal with Iran to allow transportation via its Chābahār port. So perhaps some sort of treaty is needed like Indus Water Treaty between India and Pakistan. It demarcated the division of Rivers after the emergence of both India and Pakistan. A fee for the use of their (Pakistan, Iran) resources like road or railway network need to be set up. Once, it gets formalised, the frictions will get minimised and there will be recourse to get to an international body like Indus Water Treaty, if a dispute were to arise.

(Source: Map Of the World )

For the economic activity, a country will need to have resources for agriculture like tools, fertilizers and electricity. For electricity, it will need generation, transmission equipment. For transport it will again need building roads, bridges besides the need of setting factories for auto parts or refineries for fuel. For building infrastructure setting up of steel mills will be required. For defence needs, the country will need not only ordinance factories but also the big equipment so that it can root out the Taliban etc. from making any part of their land as a base for themselves. So, defence will need re-strengthening or building new cantonment areas around the country, now that NATO is leaving those areas behind. There is a need to reassess the overall need of the locations of all the bases. Perhaps, as NATO may not even be covering certain areas. The armed forces as well as general public will also need lots of hospitals. The country need educational institutions. Perhaps, India can play a role in everything but it comes down to meeting the costs by Afghanistan. Virtually most important institutions India has like technical, management, planning, agriculture, hospital staff training or general educational institutes can start their chapters or branches in Afghanistan. Indian govt. can facilitate talks between its various bodies and the relevant parties in Afghanistan but those parties or institutes need to be formed. Some training is needed even for the bureaucracy in Afghanistan. Since in the short run there is bound to be more unemployment due to losses of jobs as NATO and US leave, India has to ensure these people get back into jobs at the earliest. They will not only be better experienced but if they get into the hands of Taliban, it will make the situation deteriorate pretty quickly. So, perhaps these resources should get the training in India to build various institutes or bodies in Afghanistan. They can then return to Afghanistan to start these bodies.

But how to build all this since there is no cash flowing into Afghanistan. In the short run, Afghanistan has to plead and seek commitment with donors like NATO, US and India, China, Russia and Iran. In the longer run, the mining activity has to start but that can only happen if transport deals with both Iran and Pakistan are in place. Afghanistan need capital not only to build factories etc. but also for building and sustaining the armed forces. One can think the private sector will come on board for 60-70% needs of economic activity like building required factories etc. But for building essential economic activity like infrastructure as roads, canals, electricity, hospitals, ordinance factories etc., the 30 to 40 % capital will be needed by the govt. So, the Afghanistan need to decide what it will need on year by year basis e.g. it needs to set up goals like 1 hospital in year 1 plus a refinery and an ordinance factory etc. This way, it can work out the capital required for these activities with the help of donors. Perhaps, Afghanistan can start getting some money if TAPI pipeline gets going. It can also build a target of 2 to 3 years before it start getting the mining revenue. It still has to move quickly on the transport deal with both Pakistan and Iran. Though a deal with Iran perhaps will need rehabilitation of Iran in international community and that is dependent perhaps on its resolution of Nuclear Issue. What is the new road block in that pursuit is not clear. The world needs a viable Afghanistan as much as Afghanistan itself needs it.

April 10, 2014

Is it possible to resist the allure of Space Research?

Today, I was reading how India’s  mission to Mars has reached half-way stage in its journey. I was happy to see the mission succeeding and reaching a milestone . This mission has a limited objective like searching methane in martian environment. It achieved one other objective that missions can be low cost and still succeed but I was wondering why humans are so obsessed with space while there is so much on earth remains  unexplored, unexploited and rather more necessary. 'Red' letter day: India's Mars mission crosses halfway mark

I guess the answer to this lies in number of observations –

1.  The sky above is always so visible and since it remains an unconquered territory so it ‘ll continue to pose a challenge until there is something left. On earth barring deep sea or deep earth, man has gone everywhere so there is nowhere it can go. So, humans can not easily build on the tales of Robert Scott. Edmund Hilary etc.

2. The science bodies have also lobbies within most govts and they(planetary science) get most funds allocated for their pet projects. Since the prestige and visibility of  space research remains foremost, they get most attention from govt who usually after haggling still allocates the biggest fund to space research see this report .

3. The other research projects are fragmented and too numerous and since not having a  big enough voice on one or two prestige projects, so they can not compete with the space research budget.

4. The interlinking of many countries on space projects also mean that certain degree of space spending is guaranteed  but the plethora of other science projects are usually competing with each other rather than cooperating . Of course there are exception on nuclear research ( Nuclear Fusion reactors) and fundamental science projects like “Hadron Collider” in France, Switzerland etc.

But this spending on only one  area of research does not have to be. There are plentiful  impossible challenging missions on planet earth itself e.g. sending a sub or human in a sub into the deep see to mine the expensive minerals. China control the rare earth elements. The world needs more sources for the same than just relying on one country. Can there be minerals picked up from deep sea which can be converted into  rare earth elements. Chinese were given the license for  deep sea mining last year by  International Seabed Authority. The number of licences issued to prospect for minerals now stands at 17 with another seven due to be granted and more are likely to follow. They cover vast areas of the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans.Similarly there can be plentiful opportunity to invest money in unusual projects like underwater cities or using plantation ( phytoplankton) for health and food, algae that  can be converted into crude oil or  bio-fuel, Ocean thermal power plants or basing  storage power plant at the sea bed  itself. Perhaps, a project can be started  in claiming the land near the coast by shifting sand from desert, boulders from mountains etc. Japan, Dubai etc has already done this but as there are low lying lands across the world are plentiful and  such land has remained unprotected from not only the rising sea water  but also any occasional typhoon, cyclone or Tsunami . It has plentiful sea and not much on land warehousing space built . Perhaps everything from food grain to chemicals can be stored in the sea or even the the marine food (like fishes caught) etc can also be kept in deep sea . Whenever needed they can be lifted etc. Due to less sea temperature, it will be possible to exploit not only temperature but plentiful space in sea. What I wonder however is this – since all countries need employment generation.

No global leader has a clue about employment generation. They do not talk about employment generation through funding of new science projects or new technology or like the projects mentioned above.  Space programs may seem necessary but I guess far more necessary is employment opportunities for billions across the world. India itself need 12 million new jobs every year just to stand still. Somebody discusses it here in his blog. Leaders still do not believe in any exceptional funding on science or new technologies to generate new jobs. Without this, the employment generation can  just grow marginally with each economic cycle from recession to growth . There is tendencies  in countries of stealing the jobs from one other by a new round of protectionism . This parochialism can be most seen at election time. President Obama wanted to stop the jobs outflow from US to other countries in software or manufacturing and was promising to bring  jobs back from the other countries. This is nothing but  protectionism  which is antithesis of globalism and if the world is returning to age gone by when protectionism was rife then it will not be doing itself any favour.

June 23, 2013

Fixing International Job Creation Problem

Where are the jobs? Can panacea be so far away?

A few days back, there was a news from India that says that million engineers are struggling to get job. Recently, in a BBC discussion on science, I heard about the British immigration oversight in denying the entry of young Scientists to UK. Well, it did not surprise me totally. Often, the politicians across the world are glib talkers about the problems. If their advisers also lack vision and solutions, then country or any state within it will only stay at same economic activity if its economy does not get  eroded. Here is a discussion between two advisors – one to Mr Obama and one to Mr M M Singh, the Indian PM. While the advisor to Mr Obama is overselling the initiatives the US govt is taking in bringing various stake holders together to create jobs, the advisor to the Indian PM leave the impression that he has become by now a wily politician himself. The same person 20 years ago used his vision to transform the Indian telecom sector but now his proximity over a long period of time to top politicians has turned him into defending govt policies rather than talking about the new initiatives the govt has taken or will take soon.

How to create jobs is the biggest problem the world face. The job creation depends most of all on developing and employing new technology means it needs science inputs. The biggest example have been development of fracking (extracting oil) in US just like earlier it was the development of internet itself in which now millions are employed world over. There are tech jobs (knowledge economy) and non tech jobs which can be gradually be turned into tech assisted jobs or moved to a country where none exists.

The job creation does not merely need policy tinkering but also state involvement. In the earlier period of India’s development, India’s socialist PM, Mr Nehru inspired from USSR built industries (steel production, turbines, railway engines, defence items), science institutes, dams etc but since USSR no longer exists. So that inspiration is gone from world over. After Mrs Thatcher came on to the scene in UK transforming its economy, it has left the other inspiration that state should not involve in economic activity as it does not do a good job. So, the drive for privatisation has taken root the world over. India also believes in this philosophy now, so much so that it is gradually reducing the state stakes in the well run state owned companies. But in place of creating new industry from that dis-investment money it is just disbursing that money into poverty elimination programmes etc.

Some of the new jobs, in  the global economies could happen in these undeveloped  or under-developed areas –

gene therapy, epigenetic, stem-cell therapy, repairing DNA damage to treat cancer through modified virus, developing medicines using bacteriophage, manufacturing antibiotics, proteins(recombinant pharmaceutical proteins) & hormones via other animals, bacteria etc, developing synthetic biology, rare metal mining including deep sea exploration, dealing with hazardous waste recycling such as with bacteria including nuclear waste, developing land fertility, seeking control of pesticides or replacing these with alternatives so as to control the spread of cancer, water harvesting(rainfall) by creating new reservoirs, bunds etc and generate drinking water from sea using RO (reverse osmosis) and solar energy and thus removing draught conditions ( building mini regional water grids), deploying equipment for capturing energy loss(heat) at thermal plants, manufacturing artificial blood, normal organs using 3d printing technology and human stem cells, organ transplant industry, nanotechnology, medical diagnostics(scanners, dna analysers), new sensors and signalling equipments, robotics for hazard material handling, lasers in industrial (surgical, cutting etc), building safe (encrypted data transmission – optical fibre network including routers), building new defence industries(robotics), developing IT internet security industry and old tech tasks of converting all the existing written texts into online ones, creating targets for computerisation of govt machinery and legal justice system(it may help cutting down on delayed justice), develop local cloud servers companies, building freight corridor infrastructure (railway) etc – 2. Since the IT activity only helps other activities, so it is important to find those other activities where IT could be deployed. One area is where big databases are now employed such as genomics which is a field progressed from genetics.

It is not that no tech innovation is taking place in India. Here is the news about how the low cost high tech innovation is helping India improve its health. To get the jobs for million of engineers and others, you need a vision which is a mix of Mr Nehru, the socialist and Mrs Thatcher, the capitalist. It means state should start those economic activity where private sector is unable to go – it is often the innovative areas or areas where economic dividends are not going to come to fruition in short span of time or even apparent at the outset.

Schematics of a reverse osmosis system (desalination) using a pressure exchanger. [Photo Credit: Wikipedia]
1: Sea water inflow, 2: Fresh water flow (40%), 3: Concentrate flow (60%), 4: Sea water flow (60%), 5: Concentrate (drain),
A: Pump flow (40%), B: Circulation pump, C: Osmosis unit with membrane, D: Pressure exchanger

Margret Thatcher philosophy is also needed later to free the state from economic activity once that state owned activity is flourishing, it can then be sold into the hands of private sectors and the released capital be deployed into another new activity. New innovations are taking place all the time but as those innovation in science and technology is taking place in west and west does not believe in getting involved in economic activity, so most of the time, the technology waits until someone from private sector is willing to risk their capital. While the rest of the world waits for any such innovation to be established in west. It is therefore imperative in east particularly China and India to innovate so that technology can come to the market faster by active state involvement.

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: